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Lagniappe: Maque Choux Rice Salad with Louisiana Dried Shrimp

Jul 28th, 2014 | By
Lagniappe: Maque Choux Rice Salad with Louisiana Dried Shrimp

Summer, when sweet corn and tomatoes are at their best, is the time for maque choux. I love the traditional versions, the vegetables braised in extra virgin olive oil (or bacon fat) with a little heat from cayenne and jalapeño. But when it’s hot, I make this salad using the same ingredients, and I add
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Lagniappe: Scarola Strascinata

Jun 30th, 2014 | By

Escarole “dragged” through extra virgin olive oil flavored with garlic, anchovy, and oil-cured olives makes a tasty batch of greens. Gently sauté a few cloves of diced garlic and as many anchovies as you want, also finely chopped, in extra virgin olive oil. Don’t let the garlic burn, this only takes a minute or two.
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Lagniappe: Rapini (the only real raab)

Apr 28th, 2014 | By

I won’t repeat my cranky raab rant (and more here), but I will encourage you to eat rapini. While the so-called raabs you may be seeing in farmers markets are the spring flowers of overwintered brassicas (mostly kales, collard greens, & Brussels sprouts), the one true raab is a special variety of turnip harvested young especially
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Lagniappe: Rice Salad with Hakurei Turnip, Asparagus, & Leek

Apr 21st, 2014 | By
Lagniappe: Rice Salad with Hakurei Turnip, Asparagus, & Leek

Why lagniappe? Hakurei turnips and asparagus both appear in the market here in the Pacific Northwest at about the same time, a sure sign that Spring is really here. I usually throw them on the grill, and the leftovers make a great cold salad the next day. But you can skip the grilling and make
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Lagniappe: Farro with Stinging Nettle

Apr 14th, 2014 | By

Stinging nettles start popping up in late March here in the Pacific Northwest, a sure sign that Spring is here. While they’re often available at the local farmers markets, nettles are easy to find and harvest (wearing gloves, natch). It’s not uncommon to come home with a few pounds (enough to fill a few large
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Lagniappe: Bacon Buttermilk Braised Brassicas

Mar 31st, 2014 | By
Lagniappe: Bacon Buttermilk Braised Brassicas

(Sorry, but I couldn’t resist the alliteration.) The Brassicas I used for this were from the genus olaracea, aka kale. But the acidic tang of buttermilk would go well with most members of the cabbage family. Dice about a quarter pound of bacon and brown it in extra virgin olive oil. Add a chopped onion
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Lagniappe: Farro Salad with Winter Squash & Miseaux

Mar 24th, 2014 | By
Lagniappe: Farro Salad with Winter Squash & Miseaux

As with all farro dishes, you need to start the night before. Soak a cup or so of Bluebird Farms whole grain farro in plenty of water overnight, drain, cover with salted water, and simmer covered for about an hour or until tender. Let cool and drain any excess water. Grate enough winter squash to
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Lagniappe: Caramelized Cabbage & Rice with Za’atar & Capers

Mar 17th, 2014 | By

This simple, one-skillet dish is good with grilled meats, runny-yolked eggs, or all by itself. If you don’t have leftover rice in the refrigerator, start by making some Kokuho Rose brown rice. I make it like the Italians; add some rice to about 4 times as much boiling water, cook at an active boil for
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Lagniappe: Rojo Chiquito Beans & Winter Squash with Fennel Pollen

Feb 24th, 2014 | By

Combining two of the three sisters (make Pableaux’s cornbread for the trifecta), this works as a side dish or all by itself. Start by cooking about a half pound of rojo chiquito red beans. My preferred approach takes longer but is easy: use roughly three times as much water as beans, add salt & extra
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Lagniappe: Eggplant & Farro

Feb 17th, 2014 | By

Inspired by Donald Link’s Cajun eggplant rice dressing, this uses the classic Louisiana trinity of onion, celery, and bell pepper along with a little kick from cayenne. You’ll want to soak a cup of Bluebird whole grain farro overnight, then simmer it in salted water to cover until tender, about an hour. But first, the
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